NOAA Air Resources Laboratory

Quarterly Activity Report

FY2014 Quarter 2

(January - March, 2014)

 

Contents

 

Dispersion and Boundary Layer

1. Training on the New HYSPLIT/ALOHA Web Interface
2. Upgraded HYSPLIT Product to NCEP

3. International Activities

4. Best Aircraft Turbulence Probe: Post Alaska Study

5. Project Sagebrush

6. Birch Creek Valley Study

7. Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)

8. ARL Convective Initiation Project

9. Improvements to Dispersion Modeling and Meteorological Display

10. NOAA/INL Mesonet

11. ANSI/ANS 3.11 Standard

12. INL Dose Reconstruction

13. Compliance Data

 

Air Quality

14. Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

15. HYSPLIT Back-trajectory Analyses for Pesticides

16. Ammonia Air-Surface Exchange Study

 

Climate

17. Global Climate Observing System Reference Upper Air Network

18. Climate-Weather Research and Forecast Model

19. Changes in Cloudiness

20. Climate Reference Networks

21. Tornado and High Wind Climatology- Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

 

ARL 2nd Quarter Publications

Conference Presentations & Invited Talks

Awards, Honors, Recognition

Outreach

 

DISPERSION AND BOUNDARY LAYER

1. Training on the New HYSPLIT/ALOHA Web Interface
ARL staff were involved in providing training on the new HYSPLIT/ALOHA web interface to NWS forecasters through a series of webinars to each NWS region.The training was led by NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration and focused on providing a background of the HYSPLIT/ALOHA integration, the web interface, and how to interpret the results.ARL scientists were available at several webinars to answer HYSPLIT specific questions.Feedback provided by the NWS coordinators indicated that the webinars were well attended and the interest was high. Glenn Rolph also gave a webinar to NWS Southern Region forecasters on February 20 that provided them with background material and a demonstration of the HYSPLIT improvised nuclear device (IND) simulation.The IND simulation was added recently to the modeling tools available to the forecasters on the HYSPLIT web server and will be used by the forecasters during an upcoming Federal Emergency Management Agency IND exercise.A research paper on the HYSPLIT model and IND simulation was also submitted to the Journal of Environmental Radioactivity.glenn.rolph@noaa.gov

 

2. Upgraded HYSPLIT Product to NCEP

Barbara Stunder submitted an upgraded HYSPLIT transport and dispersion model package to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) for the planned September 2014 implementation into NCEP operations.EMC will conduct further testing and evaluation; then give the code to NCEP Central Operations for additional testing, evaluation, and implementation.The significant upgrades in this package were:

-    upgraded HYSPLIT main source code, library, and pre- and post-processing programs to ARL HYSPLIT revision number 560 (January 2014),

-    new application to support the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, developed by ARL colleague Tianfeng Chai and others,

-    the addition of relatively high vertical- and horizontal-resolution Global Forecast System (GFS) meteorological model output for NCEP volcanic ash and radiological applications, with the potential for use in other NCEP applications.

The main improvements to the dispersion code are 1) the option to differentiate the vertical Lagrangian time scale for stable and unstable conditions, and 2) to use pre-computed random numbers to speed up run time for some run configurations.The GFS data are on a half-degree latitude-longitude grid and on the GFS native hybrid levels.  HYSPLIT, developed at ARL, is run at NCEP to create dispersion (plume) predictions of smoke, dust, volcanic ash, radionuclides, and for other smaller HAZMAT-type incidents.These applications at NCEP have unique pre- and post-processing details, but all run the same dispersion program.barbara.stunder@noaa.gov

 

3. International Activities

Ariel Stein taught a graduate course entitled "Contaminacion Atmosferica: Origen, Tratamiento y Control", at the Universidad Internacional de Andalucia in Huelva, Spain. This graduate course is considered one of the top courses in Spain regarding environmental pollution and air quality. While there, he met with his postdoc Dr. Celia Milford, who is developing a modeling capability to simulate heavy metal dispersion from a power plant using HYSPLIT. Ariel is also collaborating with Dr. Diego Gaiero from the University of Cordoba, Argentina to run HYSPLIT dispersion simulations of volcanic ash in South America. ariel.stein@noaa.gov

 

4. Best Aircraft Turbulence Probe: Post Alaska Study

It was discovered that the OpSens fiber-optic temperature (FOT) sensor, a key component in the heat flux measurement system of the Best Aircraft Turbulence (BAT) probe, had an "adaptive" filter enabled by default. This issue may have affected measurements collected during the Alaska study last August because the response of the FOT sensor to high-frequency fluctuations in temperature was more strongly damped than we had expected from the unit's specifications.With the adaptive filter removed, there was significant improvement in the frequency response of the FOT sensor during testing both on the bench and in ambient air.Further testing of the sensor mounted on a vehicle, which is expected to better approach flight conditions, is planned.ed.dumas@noaa.gov, R. Dobosy, B. Baker

 

5. Project Sagebrush

Quality control and assurance analyses of the bag sampling and fast response tracer gas analyzer (TGA) tracer data sets for all tests was completed. All of the data have been incorporated into the master database and flagged as appropriate. Comprehensive draft reports describing all sampling activities and QC procedures have been prepared for the bag sampling and TGA data for eventual inclusion as chapters in a formal report on Project Sagebrush. Analysis of tracer plume dispersion will be conducted in conjunction with the analysis of the measured turbulence and other meteorological data.

 

The Grid 3 tall tower, located near the tracer sampling array, was heavily instrumented with additional sonic anemometers provided by FRD; an extensive package of turbulence and energy balance instrumentation provided by Washington State University (WSU), as well as with the routine suite of instrumentation used for mesonet purposes. Together these data will provide a detailed look at the vertical profiles of turbulence. All of the tower instrumentation will remain in place until June in an ongoing study of the structure of vertical turbulence in a wide range of meteorological conditions, which began in late September 2013. Ultimately the Grid 3 tower measurements will provide data for the Project Sagebrush tracer tests, as well as a rich database for a separate comprehensive analysis of vertical turbulence structures over a broad range of conditions. Receipt of the WSU portion of the data is pending.

 

A preliminary consolidation and review of the Project Sagebrush meteorological measurements for the actual test days has been completed utilizing the data collected by FRD. A much more detailed and complete analysis of the meteorological data is pending acquisition of the data collected by WSU. kirk.clawson@noaa.gov

6. Birch Creek Valley Study

Analysis of the Birch Creek dataset during the previous reporting quarter focused on the monthly/seasonal changes in diurnal flow patterns, especially with respect to the interaction between mountain valley flows and flows on the Snake River Plain. A draft manuscript is currently in preparation that will describe these interactions and other effects of complex terrain. Preliminary results have provided several insights into the factors that affect the timing, duration, wind direction shifts, and potential disruptions to routine diurnal wind patterns across southeast Idaho. The current effort is focused on the summer season but later work could expand into the winter and spring months. A second analysis of individual wind events featuring unusual flow patterns and abrupt temporal and/or spatial changes within a mountain valley (Birch Creek) is on hold pending availability of the higher spatial resolution datasets acquired by our partner, the USFS Fire Sciences Laboratory.It is anticipated that their data will be available within the next couple of months. Several potentially very interesting cases have been identified in the data presently available to us. dennis.finn@noaa.gov, Jason Rich

 

7. Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)

NOAA and the Department of Energy are planning a WFIP2 project that will extend the research into complex terrain. The final location of the main field study for WFIP2 is still undecided. However, ARL's Field Research Division (FRD) has pointed out that over 200 wind turbines are located roughly 10 km east of Idaho Falls in complex terrain. FRD's existing Mesonet covers a large region just west of the turbines, and the observations could easily be extended eastward to cover the wind farms at relatively low cost. NOAA has accepted this concept as a potentially useful activity related to the WFIP2 program. FRD is developing plans to install research grade measurements---including flux systems, sodars, and a radar wind profiler---in the wind farms starting this summer. Discussions are already under way with the company operating one of the four wind farms in the region. The research plans are being closely coordinated with researchers at the Earth System Research Laboratory who are leading the WFIP2 activities within NOAA/OAR. richard.eckman@noaa.gov, Kirk Clawson

 

8. ARL Convective Initiation Project

The position for a postdoctoral associate, who will be assisting in numerical modeling for the Convective Initiation Project, was advertised through the Cooperative Institute for Climate & Satellites-Maryland. Eleven candidates applied for the position. Candidate interviews will take place in the coming months. The associate will, in all likelihood, be located with either the Field Research Division in Idaho Falls, ID or the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division in Oak Ridge, TN.

 

Sub-domains of the High Resolution Rapid Refresh model output will be made available for both the Convective Initiation Project's field study site in northern Alabama and a region around Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The latter sub-domain will be used in instrument testing. Software is also under development to extract information from the model output that is relevant to convective initiation. richard.eckman@noaa.gov

 

9. Improvements to Dispersion Modeling and Meteorological Display

On September 1, 2014, Google will no longer allow the use of their mapping Application Programming Interface (API) for Adobe Flash.Because of this development, HyRAD (FRD's version of HYSPLIT for the Idaho National Laboratory) has been rewritten to use the Google Javascript mapping API.Functionally this version is very similar to the Flash version, but is now a desktop application instead of a browser-based application.This is the same approach used to develop Viz+, FRD's mesonet data visualization tool.The new version of HyRAD can be downloaded and installed from http://www.noaa.inel.gov/hysplit/update.brad.reese@noaa.gov

 

10. NOAA/INL Mesonet

The NOAA/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Mesonet telemetry system continued to have radio interference problems during the months of January and February.On January 21, careful observations were made with a communications system analyzer of an interfering radio signal. A qualitative match was made with the signal and broadcasts from the radio at the Dubois mesonet station.It appeared that the radio was broadcasting outside of its time slot.The radio was replaced on January 22 and the interference pattern ceased.On February 6, Idaho Falls City Power was able to identify three potential sources of electric noise near the Field Research Division's offices.They replaced a lightning arrestor on the power pole directly in front of the building.Apparently, the lightning arrestor was arcing and creating large amounts of radio frequency noise when air temperatures approached 0 ░F.No radio interference has been observed since the replacement.shane.beard@noaa.gov, Tom Strong, Roger Carter

 

11. ANSI/ANS 3.11 Standard

The American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society standard entitled "Determining Meteorological Information at Nuclear Facilities," first published in 2005, will sunset in 2015. As a result, the standard is being revised for a planned replacement at that time. The 3.11 standard has been adopted by the Department of Energy and it guides FRD's meteorological activities in support of the NOAA/INL Meteorological Research Partnership. Kirk Clawson serves on the coauthor and reviewing teams. Kirk.Clawson@noaa.gov

 

12. INL Dose Reconstruction

INL asked FRD to track down old records related to the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program that took place back in the 1950s and 60s. This program focused on developing a jet engine that used a nuclear reactor to generate thrust. Some of the engine tests that took place at what is now the INL Site resulted in significant radiological releases. These releases have been modeled as part of dose reconstruction projects related to employee compensation. The new request was related to a specific series of engine tests that took place in late 1957 and early 1958. It asked for any meteorological data from that period together with electronic files from dispersion model runs that were likely completed by FRD in the 1980s to simulate the dispersion from the engine tests. Meteorological data from two towers are still available in FRD's archives, but the old model runs were likely performed on Perkin-Elmer microcomputers that used tape drives. No electronic backups of the model runs were found. richard.eckman@noaa.gov, Kirk Clawson, Roger Carter

 

13. Compliance Data

Walt Schalk completed processing the 2013 wind and stability joint frequency distribution files for several mesonet sites that will be used in annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants environmental compliance reporting.In addition, all mesonet station files for 2013 have been processed and the data will be forwarded to the Western Regional Climate Data Center in Reno, NV.walter.w..schalk@noaa.gov

 

AIR QUALITY

14. Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

The 3rd year of the mercury modeling work under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative has continued, examining the consequences of alternative future emissions scenarios.  IPCC-scenario-based emissions scenarios from Lei et al (Atmos. Chem. Phys. 14, 783-795, 2014) were obtained, re-gridded, and reformatted for use with HYSPLIT-Hg.  Initial simulations with these scenarios were conducted, as were numerous other simulations using a newly developed HYSPLIT-Hg methodology in which the entire global mercury emissions inventory is modeled simultaneously. These "all in one" simulations do not produce detailed source-receptor results, but they do provide a dramatically faster way (~100x) of developing overall concentration and deposition results to investigate model sensitivities and performance.  

Previous model evaluation efforts have focused on comparison of modeled and measured wet deposition results at Mercury Deposition Network sites. In this quarter, new post-processing routines were developed and comparisons were made of hour-by-hour speciated mercury concentration modeling results against time-resolved measurements.  Based on these comparisons, the following improvements to the modeling methodology were made: (1) atmospheric mercury chemical reaction rates have been adjusted (oxidation by OH and O3 in earlier formulations appears to have been too fast); and (2) model spin-up time has been lengthened (now ~2 years spin up). It is noted that there is independent scientific justification for each of these changes. With these modifications, model estimates of ambient mercury concentrations are encouragingly consistent with measurements. mark.cohen@noaa.gov

15. HYSPLIT Back-trajectory Analyses for Pesticides
In collaboration with Mexican scientists (from the Oceanological Research Institute of the Autonomous University of Baja California) and Swedish scientists(from Umeň University), a back-trajectory analysis using HYSPLIT was carried out to support interpretation of atmospheric pesticide samples at two sites in Mexico during 2011-2012. Over 3500 back-trajectories were simulated and subjected to a sample-by-sample gridded-frequency analysis. Additional post-processing was carried out and the results were imported into ArcGIS for more advanced display features. Dramatic differences in geographical patterns of air-mass histories were found between different samples. A tutorial, designed in six -2 hour sessions and conducted over a two month period, showed the Mexican investigators how to duplicate and extend the analysis. In addition, in a comparable activity, extensive assistance was provided to a USGS scientist in support of a back-trajectory analysis investigating precipitation patterns in the U.S. Southwest. mark.cohen@noaa.gov

 

16. Ammonia Air-Surface Exchange Study

LaToya Myles, Mark Heuer, and Simone Klemenz from ATDD, along with Jason Caldwell and Daryl Sibble, interns from the NOAA Environmental Cooperative Science Center, setup and tested a suite of meteorological instruments and a real-time ammonia analyzer that will be deployed over maize at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Energy Farm. The preparation is for a study, funded by the National Science Foundation, which focuses on measuring ammonia emissions from fertilizer application at the local scale in an intensively managed agro-ecosystem and on development of a method to facilitate connection of the local scale with the regional scale. Sampling is slated to begin by May 1latoya.myles@noaa.gov, M. Heuer, S.Klemenz

 

CLIMATE

 

17. Global Climate Observing System Reference Upper Air Network

Dian Seidel helped to organize and participated in the 6th implementation and coordination meeting of the Global Climate Observing System-Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) held in Greenbelt, Maryland. The meeting was hosted by Howard University, which runs a GRUAN site at Beltsville, MD, in partnership with NOAA/National Weather Service in Sterling, VA. The theme for the meeting was "maximizing the utility of GRUAN activities and measurements to benefit the Global Observing System," and significant progress was made toward that long-term goal. Strong participation by NOAA helped advance NOAA's involvement with GRUAN; participants included OAR, NWS and NESDIS colleagues, and NOAA Acting Chief Scientist and OAR Administrative Assistant Robert Detrick provided a keynote welcoming address to the international GRUAN community, including GRUAN leaders, managers, site representatives, and scientists. Among the many issues discussed at the meeting was a GRUAN "launch event", a side meeting planned for the WMO Congress in June 2015, to formally introduce GRUAN to Permanent Representatives to WMO. Dian serves on the Working Group for GRUAN, which provides oversight and leadership for the network. dian.seidel@noaa.gov

 

18. Climate-Weather Research and Forecast Model

ARL used the Climate-Weather Research and Forecast (CWRF) model to perform down-scaling experiments for seasonal climate outlooks produced by NCEP's operational Climate Forecast System (CFS). The experiments were performed for the summers of 2011, 2012, and 2013.  CFS forecasts have very limited skill to forecast beyond one month leading time, especially for precipitation. Summer precipitation forecasting is even more difficult for global models, such as CFS, since mesoscale atmospheric systems dominate during the season.  Also, the atmospheric system could not be resolved by the CFS's ~100km scale grid. The CWRF model has a 30-km grid resolution which can describe the mesoscale systems by improved physics representation, and it can also resolve heterogeneous terrains including mountainous and coastal areas.  The results demonstrated CWRF improvements over CFS. With the improved forecasts, there can be more accurate outlooks for extreme events, such as droughts and floods, heat waves and cold surges.  A manuscript and presentation titled "A Hybrid Approach to Improve Skills of Seasonal Climate Outlooks" is in preparation. julian.wang@noaa.gov, Shuyan Liu.

 

19. Changes in Cloudiness
Hyelim Yoo joined ARL staff in February to work on assessing changes in cloudiness using satellite and ground-based data.  She has obtained and processed several satellite cloud datasets and done initial comparisons with the weather service and military weather station dataset of total cloud amount previously created by ARL.
melissa.free@noaa.gov, Hyelim Yoo

 

20. Climate Reference Networks

ATDD staff made twenty-eight Climate Reference Network annual maintenance site visits and one unscheduled maintenance visit. mark.e.hall@noaa.gov

 

21. Tornado and High Wind Climatology- Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

A tornado and high wind climatology of the INL and southeastern Idaho was prepared and submitted to the Department of Energy-Idaho. The climatology was prepared in response to a tornado design basis inquiry. It was noted that 6 tornadoes have been reported on the INL since 1950. These have mostly been F0 category tornadoes, with one F1 tornado. Straight-line wind gusts in excess of 90 mph have been recorded by the NOAA/INL Mesonet four times since 1994 and were the result of thunderstorm outflow.Straight-line wind gusts that exceed the EF0 threshold of 65 mph are a more common occurrence than are tornadoes on the INL. For a beyond design basis extreme event, a EF4 tornado with a path length of 1.5 miles and a coverage area of 5.3 square miles can be assumed with a probability of 10-7 yr-1. Jason Rich gave a formal presentation of the tornado climatology to DOE-ID management on February 5. kirk.clawson@noaa.gov, Jason Rich, and Rick Eckman

 

ARL 2nd Quarter Publications

 

Published Papers:

Gaumont-Guay,D. , T.A. Black, A.G. Barr, T.J. Griffis, R.S. JassalP. Krishnan, N. Grant and Z. Nesic. (2014). Eight years of forest-floor CO2 exchange in a boreal black spruce forest: spatial integration and multi-temporal trends, 184 , 25-35, Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168192313002177

 

Lei, H., D. J. Wuebbles, X.Z. Liang, Z. Tao, S. Olsen, R. Artz, X. Ren, and M. Cohen. (2014). Projections of atmospheric mercury levels and their effect on air quality in the United States. Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics. 14(2): 783-795. doi:10.5194/acp-14-783-2014

 

Lei, H. and J. X. L. Wang (2014). Sensitivities of NOx transformation and the effects on surface ozone and nitrate. Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics. 14(3): 1385-1396. doi: 10.5194/acp-14-1385-2014

 

Seidel, D.J., G. Feingold, A. R. Jacobson, and N. Loeb (2014). "Detection limits of albedo changes induced by climate engineering." Nature Climate Change 4(2): 93-98. doi:10.1038/nclimate2076.

To help inform discussions of possible climate engineering proposals that seek to increase the reflectivity of the Earth, this study provides estimates of the magnitude of changes in albedo that could be detected using satellite observations of incoming and reflected sunlight. The analysis was highlighted on the NOAA Research web site, garnered some media attention, and will be the subject of a planned "featured image" item on NOAA's climate.gov.

 

Technical Memos

 

Dumas, E., R. Dobosy, D. Senn, B. Baker, D. Sayres, C. Tuozzolo, M. Rivero, N. Allen, C. Healy, J. Munster, J. Anderson, 2014: Airborne measurements of CO2 and CH4 fluxes over the Alaskan North Slope using the Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL) system.  NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR ARL-267, Air Resources Laboratory, Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 50 pp, February 2014.

 

The Tech Memo provides details of the Best Aircraft Turbulence (BAT) probe instruments and their use in the first ATDD-Harvard-Aurora campaign in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, in August, 2013.

 

Conference Presentations & Invited Talks

 

Glenn Rolph gave a presentation as an invited speaker at a one day conference organized by the Association pour la prÚvention de la contamination de l'air et du sol (APCAS, i.e. Association for the prevention of contamination of the air and soil), which was held in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, on March 27, 2014. The APCAS is the Quebec Section of the Air & Waste Management Association. The title of the conference was the "Environmental Risk Management of Industrial Origin: Impacts on Air Quality". Glenn gave a presentation on the research activities of ARL, how ARL supports forecasters of the National Weather Service, and our new collaboration with NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration for the incorporation of the ALOHA term source model in the HYSPLIT model.Glenn also paid a visit to the Canadian Meteorological Centre of Environment Canada to give the same presentation and discuss our common research interests.

 

Dian Seidel participated in the Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) 5th General Assembly, 12-17 January 2014 in Queenstown New Zealand.  She presented an invited keynote address on "Temperature trends: Our evolving understanding" and two posters on climate engineering studies. She participated in a special function for students and early-career scientists, a side meeting on sudden stratospheric warmings, and, following the General Assembly, a meeting of the SPARC Scientific Steering Group meeting, as co-chair of the SPARC Temperature Trends Activity.

 

Rick Eckman gave an oral presentation of "Project Sagebrush: Revisiting Short-range Dispersion Using Modern Instrumentation" at the 2014 American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting in Atlanta. Rick provided an overview of the project together with some preliminary results from Phase 1 of the study conducted in October 2013.

 

A poster entitled "A Probabilistic Method for the Estimation of Surface Roughness and Displacement Height Using Limited Wind Profile Information" by Rick Eckman, Dennis Finn, and Kirk Clawson was presented at the 2014 American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting. It described work stemming from the original Wind Forecast Improvement Project study in Texas in 2011-2012.

 

Awards, Honors, Recognition

 

Dian Seidel has been appointed by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Council to serve (with three other colleagues) on the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Governing Board and to be the AMS designee to the AIP Executive Committee.  The AMS recently became a Member Society of the AIP.  With offices in College Park, Maryland, AIP serves a federation of ten physical science societies in a common mission to advance, promote, and serve the physical sciences for the benefit of humanity. AMS is the first new member society of AIP in 27 years. AIP is currently undertaking a long-overdue revision of its constitution, by-laws, and governance structure, as well as a comprehensive analysis of the value it offers to member societies.

 

Outreach

LaToya Myles and Randy White welcomed an East Tennessee Girl Scout troop for a tour and air pollution presentation at ATDD.  The tour included a show-and-tell of various instruments in addition to a discussion of education and career options with NOAA.  The troop was interested in learning more about air pollution in East Tennessee and wanted project ideas that could be used to earn Science and Technology badges.  With valuable assistance from Will Pendergrass, Barbara Shifflett, and Gabrielle Land, ATDD staff offered to help the girls design an experiment to measure atmospheric ozone in their local community. latoya.myles@noaa.gov, R. White

 

The ATDD Library Committee completed the task for reducing the number of books and journals in the library.  Several books and the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society were retained.  Thousands of books and journals were sent to organizations where they will be distributed to scientific communities worldwide.   Darien Book Aid (http://www.darienbookaid.org/), Books for America (http://www.booksforamerica.org/), and International Organization for Chemical Sciences in Development - Books for International Development (http://www.iocd.org/WhatWeDo/books.shtml) accepted hundreds of books and journals for distribution. These books covered the subjects of climate and atmospheric change, dry and wet deposition, and mathematical modeling ranging from 1945 - 2010.   gabrielle.land@noaa.gov

 

The new SORD website "went live." The new website is the result of a couple of years of work and is a complete rebuild of the entire system from the hardware to the software/programming and database.Numerous security approvals and testing were required.The site has a Google Maps foundation and the standard set of Google Map tools can be used.A demo version was tested by a couple of groups of DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office users.Comments received were noted and some changes were made immediately.Other changes will come down the line.A good deal of planning went into the launch of the new site, and as a result the launch went smoothly.Feedback to date has been very positive and new ideas continue to be provided.The initial release contains all essential information as well as a couple of new features.For example, a new feature allows a user to click on a lightning strike marker and see location and strength information. kip.smith@noaa.gov, Phil Abbott, Walt Schalk.